BURUNDI

VISA REQUIRED

YOUR INFORMATION

YOUR INFORMATION*

NATIONALITY: 
DESTINATION: BURUNDI
PURPOSE OF TRIP: PRIVATE VISIT 

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IMPORTANT

PLEASE READ THE RED FLAGS SECTION BELOW CAREFULLY

  • VISA VALIDITY

1 month, single entry / 1 month, multiple entryAll visa issuance is subject to consular discretion.

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(REVIEW PROCESS) / RECEIPT OF ORIGINAL DOCUMENTS:

BURUNDI PRIVATE VISIT VISA REQUIREMENTS

Original passport. This must:

  • be valid for at least six months beyond your intended entry date
  • have at least four blank visa pages

Two original recent 45mm x 35mm colour photographs. These must:

  • be taken within the last month
  • be taken against a plain light background and printed on photographic paper
  • show full frontal face, have a neutral expression and your mouth closed
  • have eyes open and free from reflection or glare from glasses
  • not have hair in front of face or have a head covering (unless it’s for religious or medical reasons)

DO NOT ATTACH THE PHOTOGRAPHS TO THE APPLICATION FORM

Signed and fully completed original application form. Please see attached: Burundi – Visa Application Form

Clear colour signed and completed invite letter from your host in Burundi. Please see template attached: Burundi – Invite letter (PRIVATE VISIT)

Alternatively, the letter must include the following information:

  • Addressed to the ”The Embassy of Burundi in London”.
  • Purpose of visit
  • People and places to be visited, with contact numbers / full contact details of host
  • Confirmation of the host’s employment details / income source (if applicable)
  • Applicant’s name and nationality
  • Applicant’s passport number, DOB and place of birth
  • Applicant’s Start & Expiry date of the passport
  • Dates of travel to Burundi
  • Validity of visa applied for
  • A financial guarantee to act as sponsor / meet maintenance and accommodation expenses (if applicable) whilst in Burundi

Clear colour copy of valid flight booking / travel itinerary. 

Clear colour copy of your valid yellow fever certificate.

Valid proof of UK residence. This must be presented as your valid UK residency visa in your passport / in the form of a valid UK Biometric Residence Permit (BRP) card. A clear colour copy is acceptable.

 This must be valid for at least six months beyond your intended entry date.

PROCESSING TIMES / FEES

All consular fees are non-refundable once the application has been submitted. 

Please click here to see our pricing structure for cancelled cases.

15 business day service:

1 month, single entry

Global visaz service fees
Consular fees

£160.00 excl. VAT
£60.00 incl. VAT

1 month, multiple entry

Global visaz service fees
Consular fees

£160.00 excl. VAT
£60.00 incl. VAT

LIVINGSTONE–STANLEY MONUMENT

  BURUNDI
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LIVINGSTONE–STANLEY MONUMENT

The Livingstone–Stanley Monument at Mugere in Burundi is 12 km south of the capital Bujumbura, overlooking Lake Tanganyika, and marks a location where explorer and missionary Dr David Livingstone and journalist and explorer Henry Morton Stanley visited and spent two nights on 25–27 November 1871. In French it is referred to as La Pierre de Livingstone et Stanley. Some Burundians claim the location is where the famous first meeting of Livingstone and Stanley took place, at which the latter uttered the famous words "Dr Livingstone, I presume?". However that meeting actually took place in Ujiji in Tanzania on 10 November 1871 as clearly detailed in Stanley's book, "How I Found Livingstone". David Livingstone's journal also confirms Ujiji as the location, with an entry the day before the meeting reading "At dawn, off and go to Ujiji", a town he knew well. Livingstone then details meetings with several Arab residents of Ujiji including one who was supposed to be keeping his goods from his previous visit, before recording Stanley's arrival. From their writings, the visit to Mugere appears to be the one on 25–27 November which Livingstone and Stanley described as being one of the most hospitable they enjoyed. The date 25 November 1871 can be seen scratched on the rock. They had rested in Ujiji for six days, and then set off by canoe up the north-east shore of the lake to explore rivers which might flow out of the Lake Tanganyika.

PROCESSING TIMES / FEES

All consular fees are non-refundable once the application has been submitted. Please click here to see our pricing structure for cancelled cases.

7 business days service:

Global visaz service fees:
£160.00 excl. VAT

Consular fees: see attachment here (by nationality and visa validity)

ST MARTIN'S ISLAND

  BAY OF BENGAL
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ST MARTIN'S ISLAND

St. Martin's Island is a small island (area only 8 km2) in the northeastern part of the Bay of Bengal, about 9 km south of the tip of the Cox's Bazar-Teknaf peninsula, and forming the southernmost part of Bangladesh. There is a small adjoining island that is separated at high tide, called Chera Dwip. It is about 8 kilometres (5 miles) west of the northwest coast of Myanmar, at the mouth of the Naf River. The first settlement started 250 years ago by Arabian sailors who named the island 'Jazeera'. During British occupation the island was named St. Martin Island. During the First Anglo-Burmese War between the British and Burmese empires in 1824–1826, rival claims to the island were a major factor. The local names of the island are "Narikel jinjira" which means 'Coconut Island' in Bengali, and "Daruchini Dwip" which means "Cinnamon island" in Bengali. It is the only coral island in Bangladesh.It is also the southernmost part among Extreme Points of Bangladesh. Most of the island's approximately 3,700 inhabitants live primarily from fishing. The other staple crops are rice and coconut. Being very common on the island, algae are collected, dried, and exported to Myanmar. Between October and April, the fishermen from neighboring areas bring their caught fishes to the island's temporary wholesale market. However, imports of chicken, meat and other foods come in from the mainland Bangladesh and Myanmar (Burma). As the centre and the south are mainly farmland and makeshift huts, most of the permanent structures are around the far north. During the rainy season, because of the dangerous conditions on the Bay of Bengal, the inhabitants have no scope to go to the mainland (Teknaf) and their life can become dangerous. There is a hospital on the island, but in the past there has often been no doctor.